• Welcome to our brand new website!

  • If you want your annoucement displayed here please email us.

Famous People of Monmouth

Charles Rolls

Charles Rolls
DOB

August 27 1877

Death

July 12 1910

Website
Website
Website
Other

No other information

Description

The Honourable Charles Stewart Rolls (August 27, 1877 - July 12, 1910) was, together with Frederick Henry Royce, a co-founder of the Rolls-Royce car manufacturing firm.

He was born in Berkeley Square, London but retained a strong family connection with his ancestral home of The Hendre, near Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales.

Click for more information

He was a son of the 1st Baron Llangattock.

Rolls was educated at Eton College and Trinity College, Cambridge, and from his youth was interested in engines.

He owned his first car at 18 - one of the very first three cars owned in Wales.

Rolls was a big man. He stood about 6'5".

Rolls started one of Britain's first car dealerships when he started importing and selling French made vehicles.

He teamed up with Frederick Henry Royce to found the manufacturing company in 1906, Royce providing the technical expertise to go with Rolls's financial backing and business acumen. They were winning awards for the engineering reliability of their cars by 1907.

Rolls was also a pioneer aviator and initially, balloonist. He made over 170 balloon ascents. He was a founding member of the Royal Aero Club in 1903 and was the second person in Britain to be licensed to fly by them.

In 1903 he also won the Gordon Bennet Gold Medal for the longest single flight time. On June 2, 1910, he became the first man to make a non-stop double crossing of the English Channel by plane, taking 95 minutes - faster than Bleriot.

In the same year, he was killed in an air crash at Bournemouth when the tail of his Wright Flyer broke off, making him the first Briton to be killed in an aeronautical accident, and the eleventh internationally.

A statue in his memory, in which he is seen holding a biplane model, was erected in Agincourt Square, Monmouth.

His grave lies in a little known corner of Monmouthshire at the now disused church of Llangattock Vibon Avel, where many of the Rolls family lie buried in various family tombs. His grave is just below Llangattock Manor and bears the inscription 'Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God'.

 

Henry V

Henry V
DOB

16 September 1386

Death

31 August 1422

Website
Website
Website
Other

No other information

Description

Henry V (16 September 1386 – 31 August 1422) was King of England from 1413 until his death at the age of 35 in 1422. He was the second English monarch who came from the House of Lancaster.

After military experience fighting various lords who rebelled against his father, Henry IV, Henry came into political conflict with the increasingly ill king.

After his father's death, Henry rapidly assumed control of the country and embarked on war with France.

Click for more information

From an unassuming start, his military successes in the Hundred Years' War, culminating with his famous victory at the Battle of Agincourt, saw him come close to conquering France.

After months of negotiation with Charles VI of France, the Treaty of Troyes recognised Henry V as regent and heir-apparent to the French throne, and he was subsequently married to Charles's daughter, Catherine of Valois. Following Henry V's sudden and unexpected death in France, he was succeeded by his infant son, who reigned as Henry VI.

Henry features in three plays by William Shakespeare. He is shown as a young scapegrace who redeems himself in battle in the two Henry IV plays and as a decisive leader in Henry V.

 

Geoffrey of Monmouth

Geoffrey of Monmouth
DOB

1095

Death

1155

Website
Website
Website
Other

No other information

Description

Geoffrey of Monmouth was a cleric and one of the major figures in the development of British historiography and the popularity of tales of King Arthur. He is best known for his chronicle Historia Regum Britanniae ("History of the Kings of Britain"), which was widely popular in its day and was credited, uncritically, well into the 16th century, being translated into various other languages from its original Latin.

Click for more information

Geoffrey was probably born sometime between 1095 and 1110 in Wales or the Welsh Marches. He must have reached the age of majority by 1129, when he is recorded as witnessing a charter.

In his Historia, Geoffrey refers to himself as Galfridus Monumetensis, "Geoffrey of Monmouth", which indicates a significant connection to Monmouth, Wales, and which may refer to his birthplace. Geoffrey's works attest to some acquaintance with the place-names of the region. To contemporaries, Geoffrey was known as Galfridus Artur(us) or variants thereof. The "Arthur" in these versions of his name may indicate the name of his father, or a nickname based on Geoffrey's scholarly interests.

Earlier scholars assumed that Geoffrey was Welsh or at least spoke Welsh. However, Geoffrey's knowledge of the Welsh language appears to have been slight, and it is now recognised that there is no real evidence that Geoffrey was of either Welsh or Cambro-Norman descent, unlike for instance, Gerald of Wales. He may have sprung from the same French-speaking elite of the Welsh border country as the writers Gerald of Wales and Walter Map, and Robert, Earl of Gloucester, to whom Geoffrey dedicated versions of his Historia Regum Britanniae. It has been argued, by Frank Stenton among others that Geoffrey's parents may have been among the many Bretons who took part in William I's Conquest and settled in the southeast of Wales. Monmouth had been in the hands of Breton lords since 1075 or 1086 and the names Galfridus and Arthur (if interpreted as a patronymic) were more common among the Bretons than the Welsh.

He may have served for a while in a Benedictine priory in Monmouth. However, most of his adult life appears to have been spent outside Wales. Between 1129 and 1151 his name appears on six charters in the Oxford area, sometimes styled magister ("teacher"). He was probably a secular canon of St. George's college. All the charters signed by Geoffrey are also signed by Walter, Archdeacon of Oxford, also a canon at that church. Another frequent co-signatory is Ralph of Monmouth, a canon of Lincoln.

On 21 February 1152 Archbishop Theobald consecrated Geoffrey as bishop of St Asaph, having ordained him a priest 10 days before. "There is no evidence that he ever visited his see," writes Lewis Thorpe, "and indeed the wars of Owain Gwynedd make this most unlikely." He appears to have died between 25 December 1154 and 24 December 1155, in 1155 according to Welsh chronicles, when his apparent successor, Richard, took office.

 

Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson

Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson
DOB

29 September 1758

Death

21 October 1805

Website
Website
Website
Other

No other information

Description

Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, KB (29 September 1758 – 21 October 1805) was a flag officer famous for his service in the Royal Navy, particularly during the Napoleonic Wars.

He was noted for his inspirational leadership and superb grasp of strategy and unconventional tactics, which resulted in a number of decisive naval victories.

He was wounded several times in combat, losing one arm and the sight in one eye. Of his several victories, the best known and most notable was the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, during which he was shot and killed.

Click for more information

Nelson was born into a moderately prosperous Norfolk family and joined the navy through the influence of his uncle, Maurice Suckling.

He rose rapidly through the ranks and served with leading naval commanders of the period before obtaining his own command in 1778.

He developed a reputation in the service through his personal valour and firm grasp of tactics but suffered periods of illness and unemployment after the end of the American War of Independence.

The outbreak of the French Revolutionary Wars allowed Nelson to return to service, where he was particularly active in the Mediterranean. He fought in several minor engagements off Toulon and was important in the capture of Corsica and subsequent diplomatic duties with the Italian states. In 1797, he distinguished himself while in command of HMS Captain at the Battle of Cape St Vincent.

Shortly after the battle, Nelson took part in the Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, where his attack was defeated and he was badly wounded, losing his right arm, and was forced to return to England to recuperate.

The following year, he won a decisive victory over the French at the Battle of the Nile and remained in the Mediterranean to support the Kingdom of Naples against a French invasion.

In 1801, he was dispatched to the Baltic and won another victory, this time over the Danes at the Battle of Copenhagen.

He subsequently commanded the blockade of the French and Spanish fleets at Toulon and, after their escape, chased them to the West Indies and back but failed to bring them to battle.

After a brief return to England, he took over the Cádiz blockade in 1805.

On 21 October 1805, the Franco-Spanish fleet came out of port, and Nelson's fleet engaged them at the Battle of Trafalgar.

The battle was Britain's greatest naval victory, but during the action Nelson was fatally wounded by a French sniper. His body was brought back to England where he was accorded a state funeral.

Nelson's death at Trafalgar secured his position as one of Britain's most heroic figures.

Numerous monuments, including Nelson's Column in Trafalgar Square, London, have been created in his memory and his legacy remains highly influential.